flatliner articulated streamer

Flatliner Articulated Streamer Fly Pattern

A BRAND NEW articulated streamer from Kelly Galloup. The Flatliner is a horizontally (is that a word) flat profiled fly…..cool stuff!

Recipe:
Rear Hook:
Hook – Gamakatsu Sp11 3L3H #2 https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…
Tail – Schlappen https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…
Flash – Flashabou https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…
Body – Polar Chenille https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…
Wing – Marabou https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…

Front Hook:
Hook – Gamakatsu B10s #1 https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…
Body – Polar Chenille
Wing – Marabou
Body – Polar Chenille
Head/Wing – Marabou
Head – Laser Dub https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…
Eyes – Flymen Eyes https://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.ph…

Fly Pattern Variations

Fly Pattern Variations

During this tutorial, I go through the tying of the Prince nymph pattern, with the focus on my thought process when making variations to the original pattern. As an experienced fly tyer, making variations is something Tim completes with ease, but he also understands that those with less experience are interested in why certain decisions are made when tying. Throughout this tutorial, the areas to vary include beads, weight, tails, ribbing, body material, hackle/legs, and the stingers. There is also time spent discussing hot spots @ the front of the pattern.

Tips and Tricks for Tying Hen Hackle

Tips and Tricks For Using Hen Hackle

In this “Tips & Techniques” fly tying video, Tim explains some common uses for hen hackle. As a beginning fly tyer over 25 years ago, he knew little about the differences between hen and rooster, thus he wanted to give a brief overview and show a few common applications for the actual hen feathers. There are many more uses for hen hackle, but this video features the common ones that he employs, especially with JV Hen Hackle.

The various applications Tim shows are: Tailing and legs (especially for use with patterns such as the Copper John), beards on wet fly patterns, and soft hackles. These are just a few possibilities for utilizing hen hackles.

Speaking of JV Hen Hackle, Tim wants to give a shout-out to Clearwater Hackle, which is where Tim gets the majority of the hackle he uses. They have an incredible product called JV Hen Hackle, which offers smaller and softer feathers, especially for those tying trout flies. The feathers will tie down to 18 on soft hackles, and there are lots of great colors (Tim discusses the JV Hungarian Partridge Hen Hackle a lot in this video!). There is a Twitter feed now (@Clearwaterhackle) or you can go about it via the website. When you visit their site, be sure to let Lars (the owner) know that Tim Cammisa had sent you: http://www.clearwaterhackle.com/jv-hens/

Swingin D Fly Pattern For Bass

Smallmouth junkies, this one’s for you! Our top-producing Smallmouth fly of 2014 was cooked up by our own Mike Schultz. Embodying many of the principals in Tommy Lynch’s D&D flies, the Swingin’ D is optimized for Smallies. The foam diver head gives it more of a “dart” and less of a “roll”. Faster to tie than your average “D” and designed for durability against chunk Smallies.

Best fished on an intermediate line and running higher in the water column. Make sure you’re using a very “sharp” retrieve and exaggerating the pause. They always eat on the pause…

Hungarian Partridge Feathers For Fly Tying

Using Hungarian Partridge Feathers In Fly Tying

In this fly tying tutorial, Tim demonstrates three effective ways to utilize Hungarian Partridge feathers. Though he focuses mainly on the breast feathers, he take some time at the beginning of the video to stress that entire skins have an excellent variety of feathers and should be utilized at the tying bench for many patterns.
The Hungarian Partridge feathers are some of the most coveted in fly tying, and for many reasons. For starters, their mottling looks very similar to natural insects. Next, the feathers can be found in a variety of earth-tone colors, thereby allowing a tyer to mimic a variety of mayflies and caddisflies. Finally, when wet, these fibers tend to nearly breathe with the water, which again is very similar to the natural insect. Once you combine all of these factors, it’s easy to see why tyers turn to this feather more often than not.

The Jassid Dry Fly Pattern

Jassid Dry Fly Pattern

The “Jassid” is a great tiny dry fly for technical waters. The Jassid was originally developed by Vince Marinaro and made to imitate a small leaf hopper. I believe the Jassid imitates all kinds of tiny little bugs found throughout late summer, such as beetles, large ants, spiders and even micro caddis. Whatever a trout think the Jassid fly is, they go crazy for it!! The Jassid is one of those flies you whip out when a fish has refused every pattern in your fly box. You need good eyes to see the Jassid on the water. The slim profile and sparse hackle allow for this fly to sit delicately on the surface, making it VERY had to see. Just watch for the rise in the vicinity of the fly!!

Jassid Fly Tying Recipe:
Hook: #18-24 Tiemco 100
Thread: Brown 14/0 or 16/0 Veevus
Hackle: Grizzly Whiting High and Dry Rooster Cape
Body: Chocolate Brown Hareline Dubbing
Wing: Natural Jungle Cock
Glue: Brush On Zap A Gap